Major Importing Countries Of Basmati Rice

In the period of worldwide markets and the subsequent improvement of universal licensed innovation rights, clashes emerge between industrialized countries looking to grow new items from plants, and creating countries trying to profit by their indigenous vegetation. One case is the contention over basmati rice. Since quite a while ago recognized as beginning in the Indian sub-landmass, basmati rice is prized for its unmistakable fragrance, season, and long, slim, fleecy grains.

A standout amongst the most essential measures of numerous Asian nations’ financial execution is the cost and nature of its rice. It’s no big surprise, at that point, that policymakers have taken huge walks in endeavoring to control the flow of their national rice exchange request to balance out their particular residential markets. The five best shippers of rice are in charge of around 30% of the aggregate worldwide exchange, and the main ten are dependable around half of aggregate rice imports around the world. A large portion of the real players, including the latest best merchant, China, are situated in Asia, which is the landmass most in charge of movements on the planet’s rice showcase. Other huge rice-bringing in nations incorporate Nigeria, the Philippines, Iran, and Indonesia.

A considerable lot of the real players, including the latest best shipper, China, are situated in Asia, which is the landmass most in charge of movements on the planet’s rice showcase. Other noteworthy rice-bringing in nations incorporate Nigeria, the Philippines, Iran, and Indonesia. A lot of the rice mill plants have been established seeing the necessity of rice as a food supplement. The increasing demand in the current scenario is the basis of increase and expansion of the business of the basmati rice exporters.

The future of rice trade:

In spite of massive increases in the course of recent years, the worldwide rice advertise has been experiencing a few times of compression over the recent years. Notwithstanding this, the world’s rice exchange is required to experience real development in years to come, as key nations keep on initiating projects to build their rice generation and radically chopped down their reliance on imported rice.

As the world’s best buyers of rice modernize their ways of life and enhance their separate eating regimens, interest for new assortments of rice is additionally anticipated that would increment, taking into account different nations to assume progressively essential parts in the worldwide rice advertise. China’s uncommon development in 2015 came as amazement and, to this date, regardless of whether it will keep on dominating the market remains an intense inquiry to reply. Specialists guarantee that by the year 2040 an extra rice supply of no under 112 million tons will be required to take care of the developing worldwide demand, particularly if nations like Africa neglect to address their own developing populaces and in this manner more noteworthy sustenance asset necessities.

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Educational Technology and Science – A Perfect Fit

Even as a long-time proponent of the use of educational technology, I am still amazed at the rapid pace at which it has become a necessity rather than a source of enrichment activities. Today’s students, and even many of the parents, having grown up with technology as a part of their daily lives, retain certain expectations and assumptions regarding the way technology is used for learning. No longer can the classroom computer be set off in the corner to be used sporadically for special activities nor can video be used as a babysitter. Technology must become an integral part of classroom life.

What Students Need

If our job, as educators, is to prepare students to become successful members of our society, then in addition to the traditional knowledge and skills, students must now be prepared to access, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize immeasurable quantities of information. They need to have exceptional listening skills, be able to use email, understand basic operating systems, use word processing and other software, and use the internet for research.

This need poses new challenges for teachers, especially those who may not feel as prepared to use technology as their students might be. It is time for educators to overcome the outdated idea that they must be experts in educational technology before the students are allowed to use it.

Some Benefits of Educational Technology

o increases interest (even in rote tasks)
o provides a purpose for learning
o promotes the perception that all knowledge is related (not isolated bits)
o allows for student individuality in learning styles

Educational Technology in the Science Classroom

The decision to apply technology in the learning environment is often not driven by the technology but by the task at hand.

Take, for example, the case of the physics teacher who needed to set up some labs for thermodynamics but had no money left for supplies or equipment. Because he was lucky enough to have 8 computers in his classroom, he was able to use them to create the labs. The students were sent to science software the school uses and a website. The site has some great simulations that this teacher feels are more interactive and that do a better job of demonstrating the physics behind the topic than traditional labs.

Because science learning requires a great deal of critical analysis, using educational technology in the science classroom is especially warranted. Learning to solve complex problems requires a different instructional approach than learning isolated skills and information required for standardized testing purposes. For example, while doing internet research, a student needs to be able to evaluate an internet source for reliability, accuracy, and bias; the same type of information required in science exploration activities.

In order to fully prepare our students for “real” life, as educators we need to not only provide them with the content knowledge they need, but also the ability to:

o accurately acquire information from visual and auditory sources (watching and listening)
o develop solutions to problems and then present these solutions to others using various forms of media
o display originality and employ problem solving skills during the creative process
o be team players and good collaborators
o demonstrate cross-cultural awareness
o communicate complex ideas effectively

I contend, as do many educational experts, that the use of technology in the classroom is, by far, the best way to accomplish these lofty goals. Educators must prepare for a future that involves much technology and they need to keep abreast of change by adopting effective strategies that use appropriate technologies.

In the science classroom, we need to do more with technology so that our students are better educated and better able to succeed in life.

If you’re ready to stop making “The 7 Biggest Mistakes Teachers Make Using Video in the Classroom” and want to start experiencing the benefits of using video effectively in your classroom, your next step is to download a FREE copy of “The 7 Biggest Mistakes Teachers Make Using Video in the Classroom” right now.

The small company I work for is committed to creating quality educational videos for classroom instruction. From the earliest script stages, all subject area content, images, and music are intensely reviewed and selected for meeting appropriate grade level, curriculum objectives and standards for our proprietary productions. The videos we distribute are also screened to meet our high standards.
Teachers in the 21st century classroom will be better educators if they understand how to use multi media in their lessons, if they understand the processes that research has shown to be the most effective for improved student performance, and if they know how to find quality video resources that will enhance their lessons.

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Noisy Libraries Embrace Blabbermouth Bias In Modern Education – More Evidence

The Problem

Three earlier EzineArticles introduce and discuss my analysis of the noise problem in modern libraries:

(August 4, 2011) Library Standards Have Crumbled-Time To Reclaim Quiet introduces the problem and makes the call for a return to traditional quiet as the proper foundation of courtesy and concentration in true learning.

(August 9, 2011) Library Noise Now The Golden Standard – New Values Corrupt Silence pins the blame for the problem of noisy libraries largely on the dominant cultural values of Western society that reject silence.

(August 17, 2011) Modern Education Experts Profess Value Of Silence – Why Librarians Ignore locates the source of the noisy library problem in current pedagogies (i.e., teaching philosophies) that privilege speech, as documented by five, peer-reviewed expert sources in the field of education.

The present EzineArticle lists four additional, peer-reviewed, expert sources that further document troubling cultural forces in today’s educational system that are degrading the quality of these once-quiet public spaces.

The following paragraphs list citations of my latest sources, along with my interpretations of each source’s main points:

Huey-li Li (2001). Silences And Silencing Silences. THE PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION SOCIETY YEARBOOK 2001:157-165.

Educational discussions about silence seem to be erroneous and one-dimensional, treating the absence of talk as the consequence of a disciplinary act only.

In modern discussions about multi-cultural education, educators should re-think the simple dichotomy of silence versus speech and challenge the primacy of speech.

Technological advancements in modern industrial society are especially powerful lures that cause people of developed nations to avoid silence and to justify intolerance of silence.

Mass media and computer-mediated communication systems constantly erode and destroy silent spaces at the public level, thus making it nearly impossible for individuals to learn how to appreciate silence, either by themselves or in the presence of others.

Americans are a nation of “space pluggers” and “gap fillers”, both in education and in life, as we obsessively fill what we think are empty spaces and empty sound gaps with the perpetual flux of objects and decibels.

The idea of “cooperative learning” has become the dominant idea in mainstream teacher education.

When teachers, in classroom settings, use the idea of “participation” as a measure of student participation, they inevitably condition students in the belief that silent, active listening is not a legitimate form of “participating.”

Speech can be systematically distorted, consciously or unconsciously, to give some groups or individuals more importance than others.

“… the dichotomization of silence and speech misleads us to devalue silence and privilege speech…. I call for recognition of the need to dismantle this false dichotomy and to develop a pedagogical understanding of silences.” (p. 162)

Megan Boler (2001). The Challenge Of Interpreting Silence In Public Spaces. THE PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION SOCIETY YEARBOOK 2001:166-169.

Emphasizing speaking is a method of enforcing the “silencing of silence”, which perpetuates the false idea that talking automatically represents democratic participation.

Favoring speech ignores reflective practice.

Systematic education in the art of listening does not exist in elementary schools, in secondary schools, in higher learning, or in the public sphere.

Silence has deeply personal and spiritual aspects, regarded as evils in education and politics.

Educators need to be extremely cautious about emphasizing speech and de-emphasizing quiet.

By cultivating the practice of quiet mindfulness, teachers can greatly enhance the quality of interaction and the quality of thought that takes place in education.

In political and educational contexts, silence is automatically feared, “pathologized”, and assigned no currency, yet, ironically, we must speak of this problem in order to avoid it.

Cathleen Haskins (2010). Integrating Silence Practices Into The Classroom: The Value of Quiet. ENCOUNTER: EDUCATION FOR MEANING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE 23 (3):1-6.

The current disregard for silence in modern educational philosophy begins to take hold early in a child’s life, where the once slow, easy freedoms of childhood barely exist today.

In modern civilization, we live in a storm of noise that robs children of their abilities to know the beauty of silence.

Most children in today’s developed world know silence only as discipline or as punishment from controlling adults, and these children are further denied positive, quiet experiences by adults who have lost their own ways in a noisy world.

Today’s adolescents grow up with technological innovations that disable their desires to know fulfilling quiet and creative solitude.

Nonstop, incessant noise has become the norm that disconnects people of all ages from their inner resources.

Holistic education reform requires that teachers create learning environments that offer exercises in stillness and silence, where silence is NOT treated as the negative force of adult authority, but as the positive space of inner peace, creativity, and renewal.

Kathryn Byrnes (2011). Review of RETHINKING CLASSROOM PARTICIPATION: LISTENING TO SILENT VOICES By Katherine Schultz.. EDUCATION REVIEW, 14.

Relying on verbal participation to assess learning often rewards compliance (i.e. talking that the teacher expects) instead of thoughtfulness and comprehension.

Speech becomes more powerful and insightful through a norm of silence.

American schools traditionally do not value silence.

Talk does not necessarily equal learning.

Schools and communities need to return to a wise understanding of silence, inspired by the saying, “You have two ears and one mouth for a reason. You should listen twice as much as you speak.” (p. 4)

RECAP

I attribute the relatively recent problem of excessive noise in libraries to four main causes:

Modern, Western civilization has always treated speech in primarily positive terms, while treating silence in primarily negative terms of authoritative control and punishment.

Runaway developments in technology (e.g., computers and mobile communication devices) have enacted and enforced Western cultural values that privilege speech in epic proportions.

Parallel developments in education have mirrored popular culture’s information-exchange mania, thus solidifying Western values that favor speech and fear silence.

Seller/consumer relationships have surpassed student/teacher relationships in importance, as institutions struggle to survive in an economy that supports primarily goods and services “aimed to please.”

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Modern Education Experts Profess Value Of Silence – Why Librarians Ignore

My unpleasant experiences in today’s libraries (both academic and public) have led me to seek out the source of what I perceive as a serious problem in modern education. The problem is noise, specifically the noise of human vocal interactions in places once revered as sanctuaries of silence.

It might come as a surprise to some people that modern librarians no longer guarantee generally quiet atmospheres for introspective learning. Even more surprising is the fact that these librarians shun silence, while they actively endorse what they consider livelier, more engaging learning environments.

From the perspective of an adult who understands learning as a deeply personal affair, this relaxed attitude towards noise in libraries is disabling. The reality of excessive noise in once-quiet spaces, thus, raises the question, “What has gone wrong in the minds of educators who now lead the charge in a battle against traditional quiet?”

My Answer

Just as classical values in the visual arts fell out of favor under the forces of popular, naïve revolts against perceived authority, so have classical values in education fallen out of favor under forces of similar naïve revolts. The process seems to have taken a little longer in education, but the end result is the same-a vacuous, relativist philosophy whose proponents denounce all authority by using authoritative arguments against the concept of authority itself.

A number of visual artists now realize that this outdated, cyclical contradiction has gotten civilization nowhere, except lost and longing for meaning.

As both an artist and a dedicated library user, I see daily evidence of this civilization lost to itself. I see people desperately lost in their own noises, sadly ignorant of their inner selves, and disturbingly inconsiderate of other people around them. I, therefore, suggest with confidence that the ideal of relaxed noise standards in modern libraries is not standing up well in practice.

While some education experts argue convincingly in favor of noise in the learning process, other experts (with a far greater grasp of intellectual processes) argue in favor of quiet.

An Underlying Flaw

In the following paragraphs, I list five peer-reviewed, scholarly papers written by contemporary education experts whose educational values pose a challenge to the values guiding today’s librarians. Beneath each paper’s citation, I list my interpretations of the authors’ main points.

Angelo Caranfa (2004). Silence As The Foundation Of Learning. EDUCATIONAL THEORY 54 (2):211-230.

The many arguments in educational literature are flawed, because they exclude silence from the studies of teaching on which they are based.
Both self-knowledge and discourse originate in silence.

A world of wonder, contemplation, and listening is revealed through a “language without words.”

We are at risk of becoming mere appendages of noises that our machines make, as well as mere appendages of our own verbal noises that we grow to depend on superficially, no longer defining ourselves through our decisions, our actions, and our judgments.

Defined by our noises, we become incapable of listening and incapable of speaking with any depth.

True learning does not take place when it is connected primarily with noise, profit, and utility.

Education based on silence teaches students to think logically, critically, and with sensitivity for the whole of things.

Angelo Caranfa (2006). Voices Of Silence In Pedagogy: Art, Writing And Self-Encounter. JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 40 (1):85-103.

The failure of liberal arts education is in its exclusion of feelings and in its exclusion of silence from the processes of reflection and thinking.

Teaching is as much about listening as it is about speaking.

Silence encloses all things, including spoken language.

Feeling, intuition, imagination, and contemplative silence are necessities in learning or in knowing.

Continental philosopher, Maurice Merlot-Ponty argued that language does not give true, genuine knowledge of the visible world, but rather robs the world of its invisible essence. Consequently, any knowledge or language that ignores or de-emphasizes silence is inadequate.

When the flatness of mechanistic thought is allowed to rule, we cannot experience the depth of unfathomable existence.

An “aesthetic of silence” teaches us to listen in ways that integrate the intellectual, moral, and spiritual dimensions of our lives. The greatest shortcoming of educators is their failure to teach that there is more to knowledge than what we can tell.

An “aesthetic of silence” teaches us to tune into others.

Prioritizing the spoken word suppresses the transformative, creative power of personal knowledge gained in contemplative silence.

Ros Ollin (2008). Silent Pedagogy And Rethinking Classroom Practice: Structuring Teaching Through Silence Rather Than Talk. CAMBRIDGE JOURNAL OF EDUCATION 38 (2):265-280.

A negative perception of silence causes a cultural bias favoring talk, which establishes underlying preconceptions about what constitutes participation and interaction.

Formal learning in Western civilizations emphasize the value of talk, and this value remains relatively unchallenged.

Creative, productive interactions can occur where there is no talking.

Educators should make a distinction between activities that genuinely promote learning and activities (used unquestioningly) that promote other agendas.

“Social” learning theory has been confused with “sociable” learning theory.

Michael W. Shelton and Karen Shelton (1992). Silence Please: Silence As A Component Of Interpersonal Communication. Conference paper presented at the Joint Meeting of the Southern States Communication Association and the Central States Communication Association, Lexington Kentucky, April 14-18, 1993.

Silence itself is a form of interpersonal communication where we say something by saying nothing. Two-way conversation, in fact, requires it.

Many original Americans (i.e., most American Indian tribes) honored quiet and discouraged profuse or promiscuous use of words. For these original Americans, the space between words was the realm where people develop character, self-control, courage, patience, and dignity.

Americans who later came to dominate the culture dispensed with the reverence for quiet, placing great emphasis on verbal communication, and often treating silent members of a group as the least influential members.

Michalinos Zembylas & Pavlos Michaelides (2004). The Sound Of Silence In Pedagogy. EDUCATIONAL THEORY 54 (2):193-210.

Ignoring the value of silence in education comes at a cost, to the individual and to society.

Respect for silence in education encourages humility, a sense of wonder, respect for the self, and respect for others.

“The current educational system in the West is rooted in ‘fear of silence,’ which is one reason the understanding of silence in negative terms prevails.” (p. 208)

CONCLUSION

These five papers document the fact that a mature outlook towards the value of silence in speech exists. The existence of such a mature outlook, however, in the face of its ignorance by modern librarians, suggests that an immature value system is shaping modern libraries. This popular, immature outlook, furthermore, is gaining great support from leaders who place more value on sustainable business than on true education. Under the influences of this immature outlook, people in charge of operating modern libraries measure success according to a lowest-common-denominator satisfaction scale, where profitable operation strategies sacrifice excellent education standards.

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